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Learn About the Benefits of Chocolate for Your Teeth

teeth health dentist smileWe generally think that chocolate has too much sugar and is bad for the teeth. Not so! There’s plenty of evidence that eating chocolate may actually be good for the teeth — and will not equate to cavities.

A recent study reveals that chocolate is actually less harmful to the teeth compared to other sweets. Cocoa beans used to make chocolate contain antibacterial agents that work to reduce the effects of high sugar levels.

The study worked with two groups — one group getting a high-sugar snack while the 2nd group got an extract of cocoa bean. The high sugar group had 14 cavities compared to the cocoa group, which had 6 cavities.

The cocoa bean extract contains a component called theobromine which helps in the remineralization of teeth — making them stronger. Theobromine is found to have greater potential than fluoride in preventing cavities — and is non-toxic when swallowed. So, besides having antibacterial properties, chocolate has this theobromine compound that protects teeth better than fluoride and is completely natural. Theobromine also creates an alkaline oral environment that is protective against harmful bacteria which thrive in acidic environments.

Cocoa beans also contain antioxidants such as flavonoids, polyphenols, and tannins that have huge benefits for your teeth and mouth. Tannins are the most notable. They give dark chocolate its bitter taste and dark pigments, but also have health benefits. The tannins protect teeth from cavities by preventing bacteria from sticking to your teeth. The polyphenols reduce the effects of bacteria effectively minimizing cavities, gum infection, and bad breath.

It is best to limit chocolate to single servings — and eat it after meals to limit the acid attack on teeth. Minimize your sugar intake by opting for dark chocolates. White and milk chocolates contain more sugar.

Read the full story here

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/beauty/dental/a28025/is-chocolate-bad-for-your-teeth/

Dr Ashley Davenport BDS MFGDP(UK)

I qualified as a dentist in 1995 and can honestly say that I have been doing a job that I love for the past 20 plus years. Most people who know me well know that dentistry is a passion for me and that if I won the lottery I would still want to have some dentistry in my life. I get huge satisfaction from treating patients and making a difference to ...

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Last updated: February 5th, 2023

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